Campaigns

Domestic Violence Prevention Month

May 2021  |  Social Campaign

You are welcome to use these images with the accompanying text and links back to the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre website.

 

Week One Week Two Week Three Week Four


 

Week One: Domestic and family violence affects everyone

Download Week One (high res images and text) Word 1.3mb

DVPM social tile: disabilities

Disability

Over one-third of women with disabilities experience some form of intimate partner violence.

Accompanying text:

Over one-third of women with disabilities experience some form of intimate partner violence.*

Seeking support can be particularly complex particularly when the perpetrator is also your carer or support person. This can also make the decision to leave a violent relationship very difficult.

A specialist domestic violence service recognises and understands some of the challenges that a person with a disability who experiences domestic and family violence may face. They can provide you with support in relation to the domestic violence and assist you to link with disability support agencies and advocacy services.

*Source: https://engage.dss.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/WDV-Fact-Sheet-3-Violence1.pdf

For more information and support, visit: https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#disability

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

Contact the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for free and confidential counselling, support, information on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: rural and remote areas

Rural

Fear of stigma, shame, community gossip, and a lack of perpetrator accountability deter women in regional, rural and remote areas from seeking help.

Accompanying text:

  • Women in regional, rural and remote areas are more likely than women in urban areas to experience domestic and family violence.
  • Women living in regional, rural and remote areas who experience domestic and family violence face specific issues related to their geographical location and the cultural and social characteristics of living in small communities.
  • There is a common view in rural communities that "family problems" such as domestic and family violence are not talked about, which serves to silence women's experience of domestic and family violence and deter them from disclosing violence and abuse.
  • Fear of stigma, shame, community gossip, and a lack of perpetrator accountability deter women from seeking help.
  • A lack of privacy due to the high likelihood that police, health professionals and domestic and family violence workers know both the victim and perpetrator can inhibit women's willingness to use local services.
  • Women who do seek help find difficulty in accessing services due to geographical isolation, lack of transportation options and not having access to their own income.*

*Source: https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/domestic-and-family-violence-regional-rural-and-remote-communities

For more information, support and resources, visit: https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/information-about-family-violence/#family

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

Contact the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for free and confidential counselling, support, information on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: elder abuse

Elderly

Elder abuse is not just physical. Other forms of abuse include psychological, financial, sexual abuse, social or cultural isolation and neglect.

Accompanying text:

Elder abuse is not just physical. Other forms of abuse include psychological, financial, sexual abuse, social or cultural isolation and neglect.

Everyone deserves to feel safe and respected in their relationships.

For more information: https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/information-about-family-violence/#elder

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free and confidential advice for anyone experiencing elder abuse or who suspects someone they know may be experiencing elder abuse, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222 or call the Elder Abuse Helpline (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on 1300 651.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: children

Children and young people

Children are highly unlikely to lie about abuse; they are more likely to stay quiet.

Accompanying text:

A child rarely lies about abuse. A child may change what they've said if they've been pressured or threatened to deny what's happened, or they're afraid of being removed from their family after they’ve told someone about it.

Children and young people who have experienced or been impacted by domestic and family violence can receive support to: help make sense of their experience(s); learn helpful tools and strategies that can assist them with managing and expressing their emotions; and develop an understanding of healthy and positive relationships.

The DVPC Children and Young People’s Service offers appointments with trained Advocates who are skilled and experienced in working with children and young people.

For more information and resources, visit: https://domesticviolence.com.au/getting-help/children-and-young-people/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000).

To contact the DVPC Children and Young People’s Service (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) call: (07) 5532 9000.

If outside business hours, contact the Child Safety After Hours Service Centre on 1800 177 135 (24 hours a day).

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: LGBTIQ

LGBTIQ

Everyone deserves to feel safe and respected in their relationships.

Accompanying text:

Everyone deserves to feel safe and respected in their relationships.

Tactics of power and control particular to same sex relationships include:

  • using emotional abuse
  • using coercion and threats
  • denying, minimising and blaming
  • using privilege
  • using intimidation
  • using isolation
  • using children.

For more information, support and resources, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#lgbtiq

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

Contact the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast for free and confidential counselling, support, information on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: Aboriginal children

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Intimate partner violence contributes an estimated 10.9 percent to burden of disease in Indigenous women aged 18-44 years. This is more than any other risk factor.

Accompanying text:

Intimate partner violence contributes an estimated 10.9 percent to burden of disease in Indigenous women aged 18-44 years. This is more than any other risk factor.*

The close-knit nature of the Aboriginal Community with its kinship networks means that family violence has the potential to affect a wide circle of people. As an Aboriginal woman you may be concerned about shame and the impact speaking about or doing something about the domestic violence on your family and community. Your obligations and loyalties may make it even more difficult to leave.

A specialist Domestic Violence service can provide you with confidential information and support without pressure or judgement about your choices. They can help you work out ways that you and your children can be safer and help you, if you want to, make contact with an Aboriginal support agency.

* Source: 2011 Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Burden of Disease Study (Webster, 2016)

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#aboriginal

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: women from overseas

Women from overseas

Women from overseas who are survivors of domestic or family violence often choose not to report incidents of abuse out of fear of immigration consequences.

Accompanying text:

Women from overseas who are survivors of domestic or family violence often choose not to report incidents of abuse out of fear of immigration consequences.

If you came to Australia on a temporary partner or spousal visa and were told that you will be forced to return to your home country if you leave your violent and abusive husband, fiancé or partner – this is not true.

The Migration Act (1958) says that if the marriage or relationship breaks down because of domestic or family violence, then the victim (the person who is being abused) can apply for permanent residency in Australia.

Everyone deserves to feel safe and respected in their relationships.

For more information, support and referral, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#overseas

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


 

Week Two: What is domestic and family violence?

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Power and control wheel

What is domestic and family violence?

Accompanying text:

No one ever deserves to experience abuse. Everyone deserves to feel safe and respected in their relationships.

Domestic and family violence generally occurs as a pattern of behaviours that are linked by power and control. This means that one person in the relationship intentionally and deliberately rules by fear, suppresses the others free will, intimidates, coerces and threatens to or actually does harm to the other, as a way and means to control or have power over them.

Power and Control is at the centre of the Wheel*. Each spoke of the Wheel represents a particular tactic which may be used by the person who is using control. The rim of the Wheel that holds it together is actual and threatened physical and sexual violence.

* Domestic Abuse Intervention Project
202 East Superior Street, Duluth, MN, 55802
218-722-2781

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#power

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: threats and intimidation

What is domestic and family violence?

Threats and intimidation are key elements in domestic violence and are powerful ways to control you and make you feel powerless and afraid.

Accompanying text:

Threats and intimidation are key elements in domestic violence and are powerful ways to control you and make you feel powerless and afraid.

This can include smashing things, destroying possessions, putting a fist through the wall, handling of guns, knives or other weapons, using intimidating body language (angry looks, raised voice), hostile questioning, or reckless driving of a vehicle. They may also threaten to commit suicide or harm or take the children.

It may also include harassing you at your workplace, persistent phone calls or sending text messages or emails, following you to and from work, or loitering near your workplace or home.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: verbal abuse

What is domestic and family violence?

Verbal abuse includes screaming, swearing, shouting, put-downs, name-calling, and using sarcasm, ridiculing your beliefs, opinions or cultural background.

Accompanying text:

Verbal abuse includes screaming, swearing, shouting, put-downs, name-calling, and using sarcasm, ridiculing your beliefs, opinions or cultural background. It is aimed at destroying your sense of self.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: emotional abuse

What is domestic and family violence?

Emotional abuse deliberately undermines your self-esteem and confidence.

Accompanying text:

Emotional abuse is behaviour that deliberately undermines your self-esteem and confidence, leading you to believe you are stupid, or ‘a bad mother’, useless going crazy or are insane.

Threats may include harm to you, self, children or others or silence and withdrawal as a means to abuse. This type of abuse humiliates, degrades and demeans.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: social abuse

What is domestic and family violence?

Social abuse includes isolating you from your social networks and supports.

Accompanying text:

Social abuse includes isolating you from your social networks and supports either by preventing you from having contact with family or friends or by verbally or physically abusing you in public or in front of others. It may be continually putting friends and family down, so you slowly disconnect from your support network.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: economic abuse

What is domestic and family violence?

Economic abuse results in you being financially dependent.

Accompanying text:

Economic abuse results in you being financially dependent. It includes being denied access to money, including your own, demanding that you and the children live on inadequate resources. It can also include being forced to sign loans and being responsible for debts that you have not incurred.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: sexual abuse

What is domestic and family violence?

Sexual abuse includes a range of unwanted sexual behaviours including force or coercion.

Accompanying text:

Sexual abuse includes a range of unwanted sexual behaviours including forcing or coercing you to watch pornography, forced sexual contact, rape, forcing you to perform sexual acts that cause pain or humiliation, forcing you to have sex with others, or causing injury to your sexual organs.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/#forms

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DVPM2021 #DomesticViolencePreventionMonth #AdvocateForChange

DVPM social tile: myth and fact

Myth

Some women provoke the violence by nagging.

Fact

Most abused women try to do everything they can to please their partner and avoid further violent episodes. Victims of domestic violence are vulnerable to further episodes of abuse regardless of their behaviour. Responsibility for violence rests solely with the abuser.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

 

Myth

It isn’t domestic violence because he hasn’t hit her.

Fact

Verbal abuse and emotional abuse are the most common forms of abuse and are present in the majority of abusive relationships whether there is physical violence or not.

Abusers use words and other behaviours to control, to intimidate and to cause fear in their victim. These forms of abuse can cause significant harm, impacting negatively on her self-confidence and her self-esteem.

The damage caused by verbal and emotional abuse often lasts long after the relationship has ended.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

 

Myth

Domestic violence is a learned behaviour.

Fact

Abusers have often witnessed domestic violence as children. However not all children who grow up with domestic violence will go on to become abusers themselves. Likewise not all perpetrators of domestic violence grew up in violent homes.

Violence is a choice. In our society there is widespread tolerance of gender, racial, religious and cultural inequality and violence. This teaches that abuse and controlling behaviour is acceptable.

However, abuse that is learned can be un-learned and positive. Healthy ways of relating can be learned.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

Myth

Alcohol or drugs cause domestic violence.

Fact

It is a misconception that domestic violence is caused directly by alcohol or substance abuse.

The fact is almost no difference exists between numbers of men who are sober or who are drunk when they are violent to their partners. Where studies show that more drinkers are violent to their partners, the studies are not able to explain why many drunken men (80% heavy and binge drinkers) do not abuse their partners.

Alcohol or other addictive substances are used by men as a means to give themselves permission to be violent. If someone blames alcohol or drugs they are avoiding taking responsibility for their actions - many people enjoy drinking and some may even drink excessively but they never use violence. Many people stop their drinking and still keep using violence and controlling behaviours.

While the use of alcohol and drugs can often make the violence more serious, it does not cause it. Domestic violence takes place in a context of coercive control and in response to threats to male dominance to maintain control over females.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

Myth

Some religious beliefs cause domestic violence.

Fact

Some abusers may use religion as an excuse for their violence.

Religion is no excuse for domestic violence and use of Scriptures to justify domestic violence is unacceptable. There is nothing to support the view that it is God's will for people to endure domestic and family violence. Some women may feel pressure from their faith or church community to 'honour' their commitment to marriage and stay in the abusive relationship. Leaving or getting a divorce is against their religious beliefs.

“The Scriptures can sometimes be misused to condone the use of power and to keep women and children in unsafe situations. Hence care offered by the church has often been destructive rather than liberating”.

Ian George, Archbishop of Adelaide 1995

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

 

Myth

Domestic violence is just part of some cultures.

Fact

Domestic violence crosses all countries and cultures. Some abusive men claim that in their culture women have a subordinate role and the use of violence is permitted to keep women in line. Some accuse the legal system of attempting to destroy their culture or say that laws against family violence are racist. It is important to maintain cultural traditions and beliefs, but this can be done without violence or abuse. Under the law the same standards of non-violent behaviour apply to all.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: myth and fact

Myth

Sexual assault offenders are mentally ill.

Fact

The majority of sexual offenders are not mentally ill. Mental illness does not cause people to sexually offend. Many sex offenders are functioning people in the community, they have jobs, are married, have children.

The media often seem to focus on sex offenders who fit the stereotype; they are selective in who they choose to report on. This only helps to maintain the silence on sexual assault. This makes it difficult for people to believe that someone who doesn’t fit that profile could commit sexual offences.*

*Source: https://qsan.org.au/myths-facts/

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/myths-and-facts/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange

DVPM social tile: listen without judging

Accompanying text:

How can I help someone experiencing domestic or family violence?

Listen without judging.

For many women, friends and family are often the first people they talk to about domestic violence. It takes a lot of time, planning, help and courage to escape domestic violence. It is important for women to know that help is available from people who know and care about the situation.

Tell your friend that you care and are willing to listen. If she is willing to talk, listen carefully and empathically in a safe place. Believe her. Never blame her for what's happening or under estimate her fear of danger. Let her know that no one deserves to be abused, beaten or threatened.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: take action

Accompanying text:

What do I do if I see an assault in progress?

If you see an assault in progress, take action.

Call the police on triple zero (000).  Don't assume that someone else has done so. If you are in your car honk your horn until a group gathers, he stops hitting her or the police come. These situations can be dangerous so whatever you do be sure to keep yourself safe. But do take action. At the very least, watch them. Being a witness in a way that lets him know that you see him may reduce his level of violence.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:

In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)

For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: know the signs

Accompanying text:

Do you know someone affected by domestic and family violence?

Know the signs and how you can support them. 

Chances are someone you know - your neighbour, co-worker, friend, sister or mother is a victim of domestic and family violence. The following are some signs that might alert you that someone you know may be affected by domestic and family violence:

  • She may have bruises or injuries or she has frequent "accidents" for which she gives vague explanations. These "accidents" sometimes cause her to miss work.
  • Her partner controls her activities, the family's finances, the way she dresses or her contact with friends and family.
  • She frequently cancels plans at the last minute or seems afraid of making her partner angry.
  • Her partner ridicules her publicly or you sense volatility in his comments.
    • Her partner seems overly attentive, remains constantly by her side or is watchful about who she talks to.
  • You notice changes in her or her children's behaviour. She appears frightened or exhausted.

Perhaps you feel her problem will "work itself out". Not so, domestic and family violence doesn't usually end unless action is taken to stop it. But it can be hard to know what to do. People are often reluctant to discuss something so intimate and they're afraid of intruding.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:
In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)
For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: encourage her to speak with a specialist DV support service

Accompanying text:

How can I help someone experiencing domestic or family violence?

Encourage her, and if she wants, support her to speak to a specialist domestic violence support service.

Many women who have found freedom describe someone they knew (a neighbour, doctor, friend) offering support and referring them to a support service. Let her know she is not alone, and that people are available to help her. Assure her that they will keep information about her confidential.

Many women first seek the advice of marriage counsellors, psychiatrists, church and others. Unfortunately, not all helping professionals are fully aware of the complexities of domestic violence and the safety issues she faces. If the first person she contacts is not helpful, encourage her to speak to the Domestic Violence Prevention Centre Gold Coast Inc.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:
In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)
For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: help her make a plan

Accompanying text:

How can I help someone experiencing domestic or family violence?

Help her to make a plan.

Your friend may decide to remain in the violent relationship or return to the abuser after a temporary separation. Don't pressure her to leave but let her know that you are afraid for her and her children and help her consider how dangerous the violence may be.
Encourage her to speak to a specialist DV service where they can be supported to develop a safety plan that works for her. Help her think about steps she can take if her partner becomes abusive again. Make a list of people to call in an emergency. Suggest she gathers copies of important documents and phone numbers. Acknowledge that she may be in the most danger while she's trying to leave.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:
In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)
For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange


DVPM social tile: support her

Accompanying text:

How can I help someone experiencing domestic or family violence?

Support her to make her own decisions.

Acknowledge that she is the expert about her life, needs and wants. As you listen try to understand the many obstacles that prevent her from leaving. It's usually very complex. Focus on supporting her in making her own decisions. If she is being abused then he is exercising a lot of control over her life. It is very important she is encouraged to make choices for herself even if it means staying with the abuser for now.

It is often the first step towards freedom. Even if she leaves him and then goes back, don't withdraw your support.

For more information, visit https://domesticviolence.com.au/information/supporting-someone/

How to get help:
In an emergency phone the police on Triple Zero (000)
For free counselling, support, information and referral for women and their children who have or are experiencing domestic and family violence, call DVPC (9am–5pm, Monday to Friday) on (07) 5591 4222.

#DFVPM2021 #endDFV #AdvocateForChange